Behavioral Science

EI vs IQ — PLUS: A Brief History of Emotional Intelligence [Infographic]

by . May 22nd, 2014

How Entreps Should Understand Two Confused – and Abused – Metrics

Not too long ago, raw IQ was often used as a way to divine all sorts of ridiculous things about people. Behavioral science has gone far since English statistician Francis Galton made the first standardized intelligence test in the 1860’s. While IQ certainly still counts, now it’s now generally understood that EQ – also known as EI or Emotional Intelligence – is a better predictor of future personal and business success than IQ.

Which actually begs the question why you’re far more likely to run into spammy online IQ tests than EQ tests (ProTip: nearly all these online tests mean very little. Most of the time, you’re better off answering something from Buzzfeed). A lot of us remain confused about the specific differences between EQ and IQ and what these things actually mean for continued success in any venture.

Davittcorporatepartners.com sent us this infographic that dispels some of the confusion surrounding the EQ vs IQ caboodle — starting off with an explanation of what Emotional Intelligence actually is:

DavittCorp-IG
davittcorporatepartners.com
It’s clear that a better understanding of how emotions influence our day-to-day lives can give anyone an edge in business. Whether you’re negotiating for a better contract, trying to understand your market and clients better, or simply want to understand how to be more productive, a firm grasp of emotional intelligence can take any entrep far.

Like this infographic? Hate it? Comment below!

Bonus:

Here’s the test that started it all. The famous “Stanford Marshmallow Test“,  sparked several studies over the span of decades that strongly linked patience with emotional intelligence and future success. While the test was done decades before the first true EQ/EI tests, the oft-repeated experiment is often considered to be an especially important step towards our current understanding of emotional intelligence today.

Reproduction of Stanford Marshmallow Test:

ABOUT THE AUTHOR:

Arthur Piccio manages YouTheEntrepreneur and has managed content for major players in the online printing industry. He was previously BizSugar's contributor of the week. His work has appeared multiple times on The New York Times' You're the Boss Small Business Blog. He enjoys guitar maintenance and reading up on history and psychology in his spare time.

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